February 2016 Quarterly Report

The Iowa DNA Project was formed in November 2014 and has now reached 519 members.  The project is categorized as ‘geographical’, and is designed for those who have direct ancestry in Iowa, or those researching collateral lines that lived in Iowa. Our focus is on autosomal, aka Family Finder results, but we also have numerous members interested in testing and investigating their mtDNA and YDNA origins.

Those new to DNA testing are especially welcome and their research aims are supported and encouraged  within the project.  If you have tested with another company, you may wish to transfer your results to FTDNA and join us.  Instructions on how to transfer your raw results are available here.

Key Figures

  • Total Iowa DNA Project Members: 519
  • Family Finder Tests Completed: 427
  • Total Donations: $224  Current Balance $26
  • Highest number of database wide matches per member: 3500
  • Average number of database wide matches per member: 872
  • Highest number of Inter-Project matches per member: 11
  • Weekly Inter-Project Match Updates
  • All Iowa Counties Represented

Nuts and Bolts

The Iowa DNA Project Surname Index can be found here.  Surnames associated with specific counties can be found in our FAQ here.  Current members, if you’ve not already uploaded a gedcom and entered your Surname and Most Distant Ancestor details, you are strongly encouraged to do so. You can get detailed instructions on how to complete your profile here.

  • Total Iowa Surnames: 831
  • Members with Family Trees: 410
  • Members with listed Surnames:  459
  • Members with listed Most Distant Ancestors: 396

Iowan Family Groups

The long term goal of the Iowa DNA Project is the inclusion of multiple generations and extended family members who have taken the Family Finder test.  These family groups assist in helping inter-project matches determine how they may be connected and which branch of their family trees to examine further to prove their connections.  Last October, we teamed up with Göran Runfeld of dnagen.net  to trial his ICW Tool and to map out the interconnectedness of the entire Iowa DNA project.   Below is a depiction of the current extended connections between our members. ICW Tool 387 Nodes

Using the ICW Tool gives Iowa DNA Project members easy access to a variety of additional information and charts including a tabulation of our members’ Suggested Relationships.  As you can see, our members are actively recruiting close family members to test.

Suggested Relationships

  • Parent/Child: 68
  • Full Siblings: 54
  • Grandparent/Grandchild/Half Siblings: 28
  • Aunt/Uncle/Niece/Nephew: 28
  • 1st Cousin: 40
  • 2nd Cousin: 52
  • 3rd Cousin: 100
  • 4th Cousin: 236

ICW Count Bar

More can be learned about the ICW Tool’s process and results here.  Detailed information and access to charts and figures is available to project members.

 

Haplogroups

Project YDNAAs expected, the most common Y haplogroup is R and its subclades, with I and its subclades being the second most common.  To date,  28 project members have completed the Big Y test.  If you are interested in getting closer to your terminal SNP but aren’t interested in the price tag of the Big Y, there are numerous reasonably priced SNP packs available to help get you further down the phylotree*.

Confirmed Y

  • R-M269: 75
  • R (excluding R-M269): 52
  • I: 36
  • E: 5
  • G: 5
  • J: 4
  • N: 3
  • B: 1

More information on the project’s patriarchs and YDNA results can be found here.

*If you are unsure, check with your Haplogroup’s administrator for advice on which SNP pack is suitable for you.

Project mtDNA:  The most common mtDNA continues to be H and its subclades with a variety of other haplogroups also represented.  147 project members have completed Full Mitochondrial Sequencing.

confirmed mt

Member Haplogroups:

  • H: 81
  • K: 22
  • U: 27
  • T: 19
  • J: 14
  • I: 7
  • W:  4
  • V: 4
  • B: 2
  • HV: 2
  • L: 1
  • HVO:1
  • C: 1
  • X: 1
  • A: 1
  • RO: 1

Complete information on our project’s mtDNA matriarchs, statistics and mutations can be found here.

Declared Countries of YDNA and mtDNA Origin

Y origin

mt originMyOrigins Leaderboard

Based on percentage points per member, the Iowa DNA Project populations are listed below in order of frequency.  Descriptions of each population cluster can be found here.  Additional admixture tools can be found at Gedmatch.

On the whole, as our numbers have risen since last November, the populations seen in the project have remained at generally consistent levels with two exceptions.  Members with calculated Native American and Central Asian ancestry have increased.

  • British Isles 16,755
  • Scandinavia 10,093
  • Western and Central Europe 8650
  • Southern Europe 2577
  • Eastern Europe 1931
  • Finland and Northern Siberia 521
  • Asia Minor 496
  • West Africa 259
  • Ashkenazi Diaspora 184
  • Eastern Middle East 159
  • Central Asia 138
  • Native American 128
  • (Blended Population Cluster) Eastern, Western and Central European 100
  • Northeast Asia 83
  • North Africa 57
  • East Central Africa 8
  • South-Central Africa 6

100% Club:

  • 100% British Isles 5 members
  • 100% Western and Central Europe 3 members
  • 100% Scandinavian 1 member
  • 100% Eastern, Western and Central European 1 member

Coming Results:

Currently, we are waiting for a few kits to be returned to the lab for testing: 1 Factoid, 1 YDNA 12 Marker, 1 YDNA 111 Marker, 1 Y-Hap-Backbone, 1 mtDNA Full Sequence and  1 mtDNA Plus.  We have members who are predominantly interested in haplogroups and have not yet ordered a Family Finder.  We also have 40 kits that have taken advantage of the 3rd Party transfer offer  but are not yet unlocked.   Current members, please keep in mind you cannot be checked for inter-project matches without a completed and unlocked Family Finder test.

From the FTDNA lab, we are waiting for:  2 mtFull Sequence (1 delayed), 1 Big Y, 3 YDNA 67, 2 YDNA 111, 1 Y Haplogroup Backbone (failed quality control/delayed), 1 R1b-M222 SNP Pack, 1 R1b-Z253 SNP Pack, 1 R1b-L1065 SNP Pack, 6 individual SNPS (4 failed quality control/ delayed, 1 delayed) and 1 Family Finder (delayed).

Do You have Iowan Roots?

Many of our project members descend from families who were part of the pioneering settlement of Iowa that pushed in from the eastern seaboard, riding their prairie schooners west, until they found the bountiful farmland of Iowa. Additionally, we have descendents of more recent immigrants, some who know the names of their ancestral European villages and their immigrant family’s Scandinavian farm names.  If you have Iowan roots, you are welcome to join and encouraged to collaborate and share your family’s history and its place in the settlement of Iowa.

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Happy First Birthday Iowa DNA Project

The Iowa DNA Project was formed at the end of November 2014 and for its first birthday has now reached 361 members.  The project is ‘geographical’ in nature, and designed for those who have direct ancestors who lived in Iowa, or those researching collateral lines that lived in Iowa. Our focus is on autosomal, aka Family Finder results, but we also have members who have had or are in the process of having their mtDNA and YDNA tested.  Those new to DNA testing are especially welcome and their research aims are supported within the project.

The previous (August 2015) Quarterly Report can be viewed here.

Key Figures

  • Total Iowa DNA Project Members: 361
  • Family Finder Tests Completed: 305
  • Total Donations: $105  Current Balance $6
  • Highest number of database wide matches per member: 3000
  • Lowest number of database wide matches per member: 1
  • Average number of database wide matches per member: 858
  • Inter-Project Matches: 233
  • Highest number of Inter-Project matches per member: 11
  • Weekly Match Updates
  • 96 of 99 Iowa Counties Represented

iowa mapNuts and Bolts

The Iowa DNA Project Surname Index can be found here.  Surnames associated with specific counties can be found in our FAQ here.

  • Total Iowa Surnames: 667
  • Members with Family Trees:276
  • Members with listed Surnames: 317
  • Members with listed Most Distant Ancestors: 292

Iowan Family Groups

The Iowa DNA Project has many pioneers who were the first to test within their immediate family.  However, the backbone of the project is the inclusion of multiple generations and extended family members who have also tested.  These family groups assist in helping inter-project matches determine how they may be connected and which branch of their family trees to examine further.  In October, we teamed up with Göran Runfeldt of dnagen.net  to trial his ICW Tool to map out the interconnectedness of the entire Iowa DNA project.   Below is a depiction of the connections between our current members.

atlas

Using the ICW Tool gives Iowa DNA Project members easy access to a variety of additional information and charts including a tabulation of our members’ Suggested Relationships.  As you can see, our members are actively recruiting close family members to test.

match totals

Suggested Relationships

  • Parent/Child: 64
  • Full Siblings: 38
  • Grandparent/Grandchild/Half Siblings: 22
  • Aunt/Uncle/Niece/Nephew: 22
  • 1st Cousin: 22
  • 2nd Cousin: 30
  • 3rd Cousin: 62
  • 4th Cousin: 114

More can be learned about the process and results here*.

*Additional detailed information is available to Iowa DNA Project members

Haplogroups

Project YDNAAs expected, the most common Y haplogroup is R and its subclades, with I and its subclades the second most common.  23 project members have completed the Big Y test.

Conf Y

Predicted Y

  • R-M269: 48
  • R (excluding R-M269): 44
  • I: 28
  • G: 3
  • E: 3
  • J: 2
  • N: 3

More information on the project’s patriarchs and YDNA results can be found here.

Project mtDNA:  The most common mtDNA continues to be H and its subclades with a variety of other haplogroups also represented. 105 project members have completed Full Mitochondrial Sequencing.

Member Haplogroups:

  • H: 68
  • K: 17
  • T: 16
  • U: 14
  • J: 12
  • I: 5
  • W: 3
  • V: 2
  • B: 2
  • C:1
  • X: 1

Complete information on our project’s mtDNA matriarchs, statistics and mutations can be found here.

conf mtdna

Declared Countries of YDNA and mtDNA Origin

Y COA

mt COA

MyOrigins Leaderboard

Based on percentage points per member, the Iowa DNA Project populations are listed below in order of frequency.  Descriptions of each population cluster can be found here.  Additional admixture tools can be found at Gedmatch.

  • British Isles 12,333
  • Scandinavia 6931
  • Western and Central Europe 6558
  • Southern Europe 1710
  • Eastern Europe 1403
  • Finland and Northern Siberia 345
  • Asia Minor 296
  • West Africa 158
  • Ashkenazi Diaspora 120
  • Eastern Middle East 106
  • (Blended Population Cluster) Eastern, Western and Central European 100
  • Native American 87
  • Northeast Asia 78
  • Central Asia 75
  • North Africa 35
  • East Central Africa 5
  • South-Central Africa 4
  • (Blended Population Cluster) British Isles and Western and Central Europe 1

As a matter of interest:

  • 100% British Isles 3 members
  • 100% Western and Central Europe 2 members
  • 100% Scandinavian 1 member
  • 100% Eastern, Western and Central European 1 member

Coming Results:

Currently, we are waiting for 3 kits to be returned to the lab for testing: 1 Factoid, 1 YDNA 67 Marker and 1 mtFull Sequence.  We have 13 members who have kits that have been transferred but not yet unlocked. Current members, please keep in mind you cannot be checked for inter-project matches without a completed and unlocked Family Finder test.

From the FTDNA lab, we are waiting for:

  • 2 mtFull Sequence (1 delayed)
  • 1 YDNA 37 marker
  • 7 Factoids (same project member)
  • 1 Y Haplogroup Backbone (delayed)
  • 1 R1b-CTS4466 SNP Pack
  • 1 R1b-L21 SNP Pack
  • 1 Big Y
  • 5 individual SNPS (same project member, 4 delayed)

Do You have Iowan Roots?

I would like to thank the project members for their patience and many efforts over the last year.  In October, I attended the Irish Genetic Genealogy Conference in Dublin, Ireland and had the pleasure of attending lectures, meeting cousins, members of ISOGG and other project administrators.  Lots of great information came out of the conference as well as ideas to make the project better. I look forward to making and sharing our discoveries in the months to come.

You can read more about the benefits of joining a project at FTDNA here.  If you would like to join the Iowa DNA Project, please visit our homepage here.  The project has converted to MyGroups and has activated its Activity Feed to encourage collaboration. The Feed may be accessed after joining and of course our links section is available to all.

Surnames and Associated Counties

iowa map

With 441 members and 98 of 99 counties represented, the Iowa DNA Project is continuing to grow.  Each new member increases the likelihood of finding matches and learning more about our ancestors and the settlement of Iowa.  Is your surname represented?  If not, consider joining!  If you don’t already have a Family Finder test at FTDNA but have tested with another company, you may wish to consider transferring your raw data.

Surnames and Associated Counties

  •  Adair: Aspinwall, Bates,Hoisington, Lounsbury, Scott, Sias, Nichols, Stillians/Stillions, Newcomb
  • Adams: Shiffer, Riggle, Henry, Jones, Newcomb, Ankeny, Rogers, Fleharty, Knee, Runge
  • Allamakee: Whalen, Regan, Devine, Laughlin, Danaher, Ryan, Fitzgerald, Born, Dee, O’Conner/Conner,Kruger, Winke, Flage, Henning, Ludeking, Baxter, Butler, Buckley, Ralston,Archibald, Sires, Duff, Speigler, Healy, Brady, Werhan
  • Appanoose: Milburn, Awalt, Morlan, Murphy, Brown, Robinson, Phares, Flowers, Crawford, Martin, Jackson, Gates, Wilcox,Watson, Zimmerman, Richards, Bowman, Richards, Van der Heyden
  • Audubon: Drake, Finch, Burns, Chase, Follmer, Liles, McGuire
  • Benton: Gallup, Dilley, Stewart, Cue, Calhoon, Younglove, Hinkle
  • Black Hawk: Belt, Whaylen, Corrigan, O’Neill, Stewart, McNaughton, House, Purdie,Mallett, Richmond, Bates, Robinson, Kerns,Beirschmitt, Duffy, Kane, Forrestal, Burns, Flaherty, Kennedy, Harned, Singer, Robertshaw, Olsen, Jensen,Hansen, Morgensen, Baer, Bender, Buehner, Call,Carpenter, Fuller, Hare, Haun, Meisch,Neisen, DuBois, Kelly
  • Boone: Lyman, Benjamin, Fenn,Harmon, Smith, Miller, Peachey, McGregor,Ballentine
  • Bremer: Harned, Singer, Baer, Bender, Buehner, Call, Carpenter, Fuller, Hare,Haun
  • Buchanan: Leach, Chicken, Grim,Duffy, Kane, Forrestal, McCloskey, Kinney, Clark, Harned, Singer
  • Buena Vista: Jessip, Carney, Marshall, Howard, Dale, Ginn, Taylor,Larson, Johnson,  Lydell
  • Butler:  Bigsby
  • Calhoun: Osborn, Godwin
  • Carroll: Wilkens, Piper, Conner, Wenck, Best, Rabe, Brunen, Wilberding, Grever/Grefer, Willenborg
  • Cass: Scovel, Baker, Gillpatrick, Randles,
  • Cedar: Orcutt, Dutton, Baker,Gaines, Gillpatrick, Randles, Wagner, Knipfer, Mottschall, Follmer, Liles
  • Cerro Gordo:  Hacker
  • Cherokee: Beyer, Schubert, Sorensen,Smith, Larson, Johnson, Lydell, Gengler, Niehus, Foerster, Heinis, Niggeling, Nothem, Engeldinger, Wanderscheid, McCulla
  • Chickasaw: Robinson, Colligan, Pierson/Pearson, Hawkins, Glass, Pangborn
  • Clarke: Sowers, Lee
  • Clay: Ewing, Knee
  • Clayton: Scovel, Cagley, Hulverson/Halverson, Sass, Roth, Kamin, Wilke, Meye, Clark, Weideman/Wedeman, Stevens, Greene, Beckmann, Stutheit, Hempeler, Ewing, Richards
  • Clinton: Berg, Wink/Wienke,Johnson, Halversen, Halverson, Halvorsdatter, Maklebust, Hansen, Johannesdatter,Dossland, Ask, Olson, Carter, Edwards, Hazlett, Whitaker, Coffman, Cunningham, Van Cruijningen, Alcorn, Chase, Hartson, Clark
  • Crawford: Endrulat, Reese, Jahn, Krause, Kutschinski, Wiese, Klaus, Eyer,Neddermeyer
  • Dallas: Hanlon, Brady, Shiffer, Cone, Ballentine, Andersdotter, Jonsson,Curfman, Nichols
  • Davis: Lohrengel, McGachey
  • Decatur: Davis, Newcomer, Lushbaugh, Webster, Roselle, Dale,Marksbury, Higgs, Weable, Anderson,Sly
  • Delaware: Klaus, Clark, Webb, Arnold, Duncan, Field, Alloway, Fuller, Anderson, Rexford, Paddleford, Walker, Cline, Willenborg, Braun
  • Des Moines: Peterson, Childs
  • Dickinson: Guthrie, Lambertus, Franker, McCulla, Nicolas
  • Dubuque: Wentz, Consor, Krueger, Metcalf, Noesen, Nattrass, Robson, Daykin, Hoffmann,Heiter, Pauly, Gloesener, Kayser, Miller/Mueller, Jordan, Singer, Boock, Wilberding, Johanning, Feldmann, Schaupmann, Jasper, Siemes, Tauke, Braun, Kleespies, Albert, Blitsch, Conzett, Jecklin, Mathis, Moser, Osterberger, Schauer, Strauch
  • Emmet: Hansen, McCulla, Allen, Crim, Doyle, Wilson
  • Fayette: Glass, Pangborn, Kappes, Bodensteiner,Vanginderhuyser, Wise, De Temmerman, Georgi, Kern, Amundsen, Kerns,Beirschmitt, McCloskey, Gifford, Johnston, Tope, Mittelstedt, Wroe, Burns/Burnes, Clark, McCann, Houlsworth, Perry, Wait/Waite, Finch, Kuhens/Kuhnes, Ewing, Johnston
  • Floyd: Miller, Klaus, Reed, Stickney
  • Fremont:  Garcia, Enos, Davina
  • Guthrie:  Dilley
  • Grundy: Campbell, Whitehead, Miller
  • Hamilton: Teget, Toedt, Pahl, Wing,Johnson, Dale
  • Hancock:  Nix
  • Hardin: Wing, Johnson, Vinje, Kelsey
  • Harrison:  Kirley, McBride, Davis, Jordan, Lewis, Anderson, Bolte
  • Henry: House, Sample, Shelton, Allen, Billingsley, Malone, Houston
  • Howard: Osborn, Gifford, Cushing,Roberts, McCulla, Johnston
  • Humboldt: Hilbert, Ewing
  • Ida: Beyer, Endrulat, Grell, Haase, Helkenn, Reese, Schubert, Bauer, Meyer,Paustian, Ruhser/Ruser, Schroeder, Sorensen, Wink/Wienke
  • Iowa: Duffy, Burns, Masteller,Gallagher, Burns, Kinney, Murphy, Duggan, Welch
  • Jackson: Berg, Meyer, Wink/Wienke,Johnson, Halversen, Halverson, Halvorsdatter, Maklebust, Hoffmann, Miller/Mueller, Johannesdatter, Naegle, Nagel, Mueller, Carter, Edwards, Zeimet,Winkel, Conzett
  • Jasper: Belt, Hyde, Pahl, Toedt, Holliday, Hickey, Debolt/De Bolt, Ross, Nichols, Weigel, McKlveen
  • Jefferson:  Wygle
  • Johnson: Minnich/Minnick, Lyle,Crossen, Fitzgerald, McCarthy, James,Bigsby, Coffman, Kile
  • Jones: Hanlon, Brady
  • Keokuk: Wilson, Willson, King, Belveal
  • Kossuth: Young, Hilbert, Becker, Richter, Sires
  • Lee: Childs
  • Linn: Stewart, Cue, Calhoon, Gaines, Rickert, Richard, Wagner, Poorman,Gates, Wilcox, Watson, Zimmerman, Richards, Bowman, Stevens, Webb, Osterberger
  • Louisa: Johnston, Herron, Ramsey, Smith, Hand, Vanloon
  • Lucas: Stevenson, Coffelt, Vickroy,Welch, Truman, Hickman, Hasting, Davis, Mumford, Cain, McGlothlen, Rodgers,
  • Lyon: Follmer, Liles
  • Madison: Shutt, Black, Cashman, Benedict, Marchel, Wolfe, Peed, Ross, Debolt/DeBolt, Gates, Wilcox, Watson, Zimmerman, Richards, Bowman
  • Mahaska: Heberer, Howard, Burke, Conklin, Holliday, Adair, Ives, Lowry,Ferrell, Addis, Adkisson, Zeppernick, Williams, Parr, Hoskinson, Myers, Wymore,James, McMains, Hollingsworth
  • Marion: McCombs, Howard, Godwin, Barr, Wilson, Cashman, Williams, Newman, Childs
  • Marshall: Wantz, Bryant, Brown
  • Mills: Gowdy, Chamberlain, Hambsch, Oestreicher
  • Mitchell: Baker, Gaines, Mackin,Kinney, Gerbig, Decker, Galt, Tretton, Gemaehlich, McCulla
  • Monona: Nepper,Ordway, Ziems, Freerking
  • Montgomery: Lee, Pittman
  • Muscatine: Orcutt, Allen, Kuiper, Heuer, Pasdach, Yeater, Huff, O’Brien,Cain/Kain/Kane, Cashman, Alcorn, Ipock, Yates, Freers,Schreurs, Washburn, Bigsby, Ager, Everett, Follmer, Liles, Fulmer/Fullmer, Kingsbury, Stiles
  • O’Brien: Stewart, Runge
  • Osceola: Hamann, Schubert
  • Page: Nicolson, Teget, Cox, Krey
  • Palo Alto: Williamson
  • Plymouth: Storer, Gengler, Niehus, Foerster, Heinis, Niggeling, Nothem, Engeldinger, Wanderscheid, Wilberding
  • Polk:  Smith, Hanlon, Brady, O’Connell, Wilson,Beatty, Stevenson, Coffelt, Burnett, Scovel, Foutch,Halterman, Boatwright, Davis, Freel, Stewart,Johnson, Warren, Flesher, Deaton, Powell, Freel, Butler, Shiffer, Brooks,Holliday, Lawrence, Cooper, Shutt, Cone, Mason, Baber, Nalley, Higgs, Kirsher,Huggins, Jones, Debolt/De Bolt, Nichols, Klaus, Poorman, Gates, Wilcox, Watson,Zimmerman, Richards, Bowman, Hendricks, Compton, Giese, Childs, Ewing, Mills, Bowers, Town
  • Pottawattamie:Shanahan, Gallup, Stuart, Dolan, Hale, Davis, Wires, Fitzgerald, McCarthy, Randles, James, Slingerland, Kirley, McBride, Johannsen
  • Poweshiek:Watson, Sebring, Krouskop, Carpenter, Krise
  • Ringgold: Hazen, McCurdy, Carpenter,Humphreys, Cone, Arnold, Thorla, Newman
  • Sac: Schroeder, Masteller,Staton, Ragsdale, Masteller
  • Scott: Conrad, DahlDall/Doll,Frauen, Grell, Haase, Hamann, Helkenn, Reese, Rusch, Steffen, Bauer, Schween,Heckt, Paustian, Ruhser/Ruser, Sorensen, Kivlin, Feeney, Baugh, Collins,Jacobs, Crouch, Wulfe, Brus, Aufdenspring,Murphy, Foley, Ginn, Mills, Jones, Reed, Elshorst, Boock, Eggers, Fendt, Meier, Runge, Tiedje, Parker, Snider, Miller, Herr, Villain,  Moravek, Byers, Finkenhoefer, Traeger, Busch
  • Shelby: Gallup
  • Sioux: Meyn
  • Story: McDowell, Allen, Wing,Page, Hansens, Guddal
  • Taylor: White, Pace, Stephens
  • Tama: Howard, Krise, Boock
  • Union: Krise
  • Van Buren: Downard, Payne, Freel, Miller, Marriott, Shipley, Watt/Watts, Childs, Billingsley
  • Wapello: Ward,Hartshorn, Lowery, Robertson
  • Warren: Stewart,Black, Halterman, Flesher, Turnipseed, Deaton, Freel, Shutt, Cashman, Braucht,Mason, Vickroy, Wiley, Douglas, Williams, Martindale, Pierce, Hasting, Michael,Daugherty, Grant, Davis, Stewart, Cue, Calhoon, Flowers, Crawford, Fulmer/Fullmer
  • Washington: Longwell, Jury, Phillips,Deen, Downing, Bradford, Lambert, Story, Carr
  • Wayne:  Hanlon, Jones
  • Webster: Carpenter, Porter, Feeney, Carter, McQuiston, Mabe, Berry, Cackler, Doherty, Coles, Kellum, Stillions,Shiffer, Burrell, Meyn
  • Winnebago:  Forrestal, Dahl, Bolstad, Loberg, Paulson, Moe, Horvei
  • Winneshiek: Dörr/Doerr, Untereiner, Kruger, Winke, Flage, Henning, Ludeking, Buddenberg, Carolan
  • Woodbury: Berg, Wink/Wienke, Storer,Jessip
  • Worth:  Halgrimson, Vold, Turvold, Moe, Horvei

Cousin Collaboration: It Works!

Featured image

I wonder what great grandmother Erna would think of all of this?

DNA testing, no matter what company you test with or what type of test you take, is not going to neatly serve your heritage and family tree up on a silver platter.  Rather, DNA testing is only a single weapon in your arsenal, along with traditional research, family collaboration and perseverance.

My direct maternal, or mtDNA line has been one that I’ve banged my head against for decades.  During most of those decades I only knew my maternal lineage as far back as my great-great grandmother Marie Haeger.  Despite pestering family members, combing through records and making my tree public in order to connect with potential relatives, I had bupkis. After two decades of next to no progress, I accepted that I probably wouldn’t be learning much more.

Of course I tested my autosomal DNA, but given the mysterious nature of my maternal line, I considered the expense of mtDNA testing was also warranted.  By that time, I had found a little more about Marie Haeger’s family, and managed to add an additional 3 generations to our maternal line, where I again stalled out.    At that point, it seemed that if anything, I had been lucky to have learned as much as I had. I was content that finding any new tidbits on my maternal line would depend solely upon DNA breakthroughs.

When my mtDNA  results came in, we fell into one of the unusual haplogroups: W3.  By then I knew my maternal line had been living along the Baltic shore for centuries, and I found our haplogroup in keeping with our paper trail.  It looked as though my female ancestral line had traveled from Pakistan through the Caucasus Mountains, and decided to stay put in North Eastern Pomerania, rather than travel on with the rest of the group that finally settled in Finland.  When my grandmother’s Family Finder results came in, they supported that scenario.

As chance would have it, shortly after I tested my maternal grandmother at FTDNA, a previously unknown cousin happened across my entry at Genealogy.net.  Cousin Peter is also an avid genealogist, lives in Germany and our 4th great grandmothers Dorothea and Wilhemine were sisters.  He has been researching our family in the German records for years.

When we exchanged data I mentioned DNA testing, and shared my post covering my grandmother’s Family Finder and mtDNA results.  Peter hasn’t done DNA testing, but the news sparked a lively exchange of information and turned a new cousin into a friend.

Although Peter had been unaware of our Eastern DNA, he said, “Of course you’re right, if the DNA points to Slavic roots.  Slavs and Kashubians settled in the area many hundreds of years ago. Long before there were church books. The generation of your grandmother and generations before, felt safe as German, Prussia or Pomerania and not as Slavs. Many local and family names have still points to the Slavic or Kashubian roots.”

I was thrilled with both my new cousin and the new bits Peter had sent me. I hoped our DNA results gave him a little more insight into the distant ancestry of our family and added a little high tech flair to his traditional research.  Once again, I was content that this time surely we really had exhausted the surviving records.

With my various year end commitments, it took longer than I had hoped to begin keying in the years of hard work Peter had so graciously shared with me.  I picked the first PDF at random, which happened to be our direct maternal line, which ended with Sophia Friederike Schultz who had been born in 1771.

I’d already known Sophia’s father’s name, but cousin Peter also had the names of her brothers which were new to me. As soon I entered the names into my tree, an infamous Ancestry shaking leaf appeared.  We all know that shaking leaves must be taken with a mountain of salt, but when I clicked on it I discovered it was a distant cousin with whom I was already familiar and one that was also in Germany and also used the Luessin and Dresow Church records as a primary source of documentation.

She had added new information to her tree since the last time I looked.  She had the name of Dorothea and Wilhemine’s long-unknown mother, my 6th great grandmother Eleanora Marquardt. She had the church book entry connecting her as the mother of our Dorothea and Wilhemine.

I will be doing the traditional research rounds on my new great-grandma, and sharing the news with Cousin Peter.  Maybe he will test his DNA. I will invite my other German cousin to test as well.  Meanwhile, it will be a lot of work to check, translate and type in this new additional information and to update all of our Most Distant Maternal Ancestor entries at FTDNA to include Eleanora, but every key stroke will be worth it.  We all had to work together to get to this point.

Ancient DNA Calculator Update

Felix Chandrakumar’s separate Neanderthal, Denisovan and Clovis Anzick tools have been retired in favor of a combined calculator that will compare your DNA to 31 archaic and ancient samples.  It is 131 MB and can be freely downloaded here:

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Felix explains, “The tool checks for small segments chunks within the DNA to see how much they are identical. You need to remove the genealogical perspective and put on the general idea that every human is 99.7% identical. This tool tells you how much of that 0.3 is identical. Instead of SNP by SNP, which mostly match each other by 60 to 70%, it checks smaller chunks of identical segments.

The 99.7% is based on each SNP comparison. If we do the same, everyone will match at ~60%. The only problem is, that does not tell the true shared DNA but shared SNPs. If we compare smaller segments as in genetic genealogy like 1 cM some will never match and that’s not true either. However, the goal here is to find shared DNA which is a thin blurred line between both. So, the idea here is to take identical chunks of small segments greater than 100k positions also considering for runs of Homozygosity, the percentage of matching is calculated. The reason why 100k is considered is because most gene lengths fall within this length range and the noise/accidentaloccurrence range of 1-2% is acceptable.”

I ran the raw data of a few family members through the archaic tools and came up with these results:

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More can be found out about each individual ancient sample and its age here.  All of the samples in the tool are uploaded to Gedmatch and are available to run your kit against with the one to one utility.

Ongoing discussion of the Ancient and Archaic tools at FTDNA forums can be found here.

The Long Finn Logjam: A Rebellion against Recombination

Thanks to his dad, my oldest son inherited some interesting DNA.  His father’s paternal roots ran deep- very deep- into Colonial America.  Because his ancestry encompasses so many colonial lines, I handle Jeremy’s match list very differently than any of our other kits. I may struggle with my 2-4th cousin matches, but for Jeremy, his paternal 4th and 5th cousins have often proven the easiest to identify.  He has  a group of matches that descend from the Pfautz/Fouts family of Rowan, North Carolina, and the bulk descend from the couple Jacob Fouts and Anna Margaretha Kuntz.  Jacob’s father, Mr Pfautz is Jeremy’s 10th great grandfather.  FTDNA classifies these matches as 5th to distant cousins. Featured image

FTDNA advertises the Family Finder test as reaching back 5-6 generations, so finding matches that share a 10th great grandfather, with segments between 8 cm and 12.4 cms seems like wishful thinking.  However, because there were many cousin marriages in the Pfautz line, as well as multiple cousin marriages with the Hoovers, who married into the Pfautz line, most of Mr Pfautz’s descendents come down from him and his children many times over. That has doubled, tripled or even quadrupled the amount of DNA Pfautz descendents would normally have.  The family is well documented, the DNA groups together, and the matches are easy to identify.  He has similar cousin groupings with descendents of his 8th great grandfather Hendrick Courpenning and twice 7th great grandfather Nicholas Copple.

When Jeremy’s results first came in and he had a long list of small segment matches on chromosome 13, I did a triple take.  Many of the names looked Finnish, and they turned out to have Finnish email addresses.  By the time I counted, he had 22 paternal matches on chromosome 13  currently living in Finland or Russia.

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Through his dad, Jeremy is a descendent of the New Sweden Colony in Delaware, and is related to many of the colony’s transplanted Finns. Jeremy’s last known ancestress to have been born in New Sweden was Mary Stalcop, born 1753 to Erikus and Mary Twigg Stalcop.  Mary later moved on to Sumner, Tennessee where she raised her family.

When I researched Jeremy’s family tree, I became intrigued by his New Sweden Colony ancestors.  The colony kept detailed records, and the founders leapt off the page with their exploits, from their participation in the Long Finn Rebellion of 1669, to reaching the ripe old age of 100 in adverse conditions to duelings and floggings and fines. One colonist in particular, a Swede named Johan Andersson Stalcop was particularly colorful, “The ‘Steelcoat’, it was whispered, looked lecherously at lovely ladies and dallied with the thought that he could have a harem. His trim, gold-laced uniform [the one he wouldn’t give up], especially designed to set off his best features and to divert attention from a certain physical peculiarity, was always glittering where the women of the colony were wont to congregate. It was, in fact, his longing for the wives of other men that first caused his fellows to band together for overthrow.”

I admit, when I swabbed Jeremy’s cheek I had hoped some of that New Sweden Colony DNA had hung on in his genes.  The colonists were too colorful, and much too larger-than-life to have had their DNA recombine out of existence without a fight.

Soon after his results were in, I received an email from one of Jeremy’s matches in Finland saying, “We share 6 Finnish matches. One has ancestry from Rautalampi, a Forest-Finn stronghold.”

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He was right, not only did they have 6 Finnish matches in common, but when I used the Advanced Matching Tool at FTDNA and  asked the database to compare Jeremy’s data to that of the entire Finland Project database, he had even more Finnish matches.  Many of them I had already identified via what I had come to think of as his chromosome 13 ‘Long Finn Logjam’.

Were these small matches real or something that anyone with distant Finnish ancestry should expect to see?  I knew it was possible that they were genuine based on the small identified segments he shared with his Pfautz, Copple and Courpenning families.  I turned to the FTDNA Advanced Matching tool again but even though many of his New Sweden Finn ancestors were Forrest Finns deported to the colony as punishment for slash-and-burn agriculture, he only matched one person in the FTDNA Forrest Finn Project.  When I ran him against the Swedish DNA Project, he had no matches at all.

Connecting the Dots

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None of his Finn matches are yet connected to our tree.  Although Jeremy’s Finn ancestry is documented back to Peter of Finland who was born about 1600, his logjam matches are Finns that stayed in Finland, rather than immigrating to New Sweden.  Unfortunately, the New Sweden Colony documentation is proving to be more detailed than the documentation of some of his cousins in Finland and finding the connection has been difficult.  So far, our best lead is with the cousin who emailed us, as Jeremy’s 11th great grandfather, Morton Mortonson is also from a Forrest Finn stronghold of Kuopio.

Recently, Ancestry.com has changed its method of determining the validity of matches in its database.  If Jeremy and his Finn matches had tested through Ancestry, would they have even been allowed to see each other as matches?  Given the sheer number of small blocks on the same chromosome, would they be considered a population based pile up ?  Given that Ancestry isn’t currently selling kits outside of the US and Jeremy is in Holland while his matches are in, well, Finland and Russia we won’t have the answer to that question any time soon.  In the meantime, we will continue to follow the paper trail and attempt to document relationships.

I, for one, am delighted at the idea that a little bit of that old rogue Steelcoat lives on in Jeremy.

Eureka: The Value of Ethnicity Testing

Once in awhile you hit a goldmine.

My grandmother Leona has taken me on a wild genealogical journey.  When it started twenty-five years ago, I only had the names of her grandparents and two great grandparents.  Since then, I have learned the names of all eight of her great grandparents, and many, many more.  By exhausting the written record, I have also learned that her Norwegian family hails from Gran, Oppland, and her “German” family from what is now Poland had deep roots in Belgard and Wollin Island.

However, and it is a gigantic ‘however’, the real breakthrough has come with genetic genealogy.

FTDNA’s Family Finder autosomal test gave Leona a very basic ancestral breakdown:

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Fortunately, for those of us who find the results a bit too general or otherwise flawed (see Hey, FTDNA Pass the Saltshaker), there is the option of admixture, or ethnicity testing at Gedmatch.com

For those using the admixture tools at Gedmatch.com you will get more out of them if you are aware of what population they are intended for.  For Europeans I generally suggest using the Eurogenes K13 tool.  Detailed information can be found about the project here.

For Leona, who according to her paper trail is 50% Pomeranian, 25% Norwegian and 25% French Alsatian her Eurogenes K13 results looked ok:

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Her results became a little problematic when I ran the oracle tool, which breaks down the data and attempts to find the populations with which the tester’s DNA is most similar. The closer the number, or genetic distance, the closer the tester’s data matches the population.

Using 4 populations approximation:
1 Belorussian + Norwegian + Southeast_English + Spanish_Cataluna @ 1.636326
2 Belorussian + North_Dutch + Norwegian + Spanish_Valencia @ 1.697896
3 Belorussian + Norwegian + Orcadian + Spanish_Valencia @ 1.737609
4 Belorussian + Norwegian + Norwegian + Spanish_Valencia @ 1.739878
5 Belorussian + Danish + Norwegian + Spanish_Valencia @ 1.767539
6 Belorussian + Norwegian + Orcadian + Spanish_Cataluna @ 1.770994
7 Estonian + North_Dutch + North_Dutch + Spanish_Valencia @ 1.773238
8 Danish + Estonian + North_Dutch + Spanish_Valencia @ 1.797363
9 Estonian + North_German + Southeast_English + Spanish_Cataluna @ 1.824932
10 Belorussian + Southeast_English + Spanish_Cataluna + Swedish @ 1.848615

Why would her data show Spanish or English populations?  I have heard that Germanic populations throw out English results due to historic settlement patterns, and of course the Orcadian values were coming from her Norwegian line. Perhaps her Alsatian or Norwegian might have an affinity to the North Dutch. The Spanish simply did not fit with any known genealogy and the French Alsatian was entirely absent.

Knowing that the MDLP Project specializes in Lithuania, I decided to see how her data fared with the MDLP k32b tool, which would be more suited to those with an Eastern European background.

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The k32b results also looked ok, but it was the Oracle that took my breath away and handed me the keys to my grandmother’s pre-paper ancestry:

Using 4 populations approximation:
1 French_South + Frisian + Kashub + Ukrainian_East @ 1.567389
2 Don_cossack + French_South + Frisian + Kashub @ 1.585187
3 Don_cossack + French_South + Frisian + Ukrainian_West @ 1.593364
4 French_South + Irish + Kashub + Ukrainian_East @ 1.622383
5 French_South + Frisian + Kashub + Russian_South @ 1.665935
6 French_South + Frisian + Ukrainian_East + Ukrainian_West @ 1.683914
7 Don_cossack + French_South + Irish + Kashub @ 1.688092
8 French_South + Frisian + Kashub + Ukrainian_Center @ 1.694843
9 English_Cornwall_GBR + French_South + Ukrainian_East + Ukrainian_East @ 1.708500
10 Basque_French + Croat_BH + Kashub + Mordovian @ 1.708919

Although my grandmother had insisted her mother was German!!!, there is no denying that she was far and away more Slavic. When I learned my 5th great grandfather Johann Gottfried Potratz was a commissioned officer in the Ruitschen Regiment in Warsaw I suspected we might be a little less German than Granny was letting on.  When my own DNA results came back and Ukrainian began appearing, my suspicions deepened.  Thanks to the MDLP k32b tool and genetic testing, we have been taken where the church records could not bring us.

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As the wife of Johann Potratz carried the mtDNA haplogroup W3, as do I, I know our ties to the East are deep, and measured in thousands rather than hundreds of years.  If you too are a W3 or have Eastern European ancestry, I highly recommend uploading your raw data  to Gedmatch.com and trying the MDLP admixture tools.  You may also be treated to a Eureka moment.